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JOE-DOT-COM    212

Hi

Saw this on face book and thought it was worth mentioning

cheers

Joe

16299814_1238370869583835_1623617761788894633_o.jpg

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Old Peter    639

Thanks Joe,

I had seen that she time ago, and I am quite cautious about oil. 

I bought a suction pump, and when my oil is over the top I pump some out, check, and then a a pint of Magnatec tp bring it unto the correct level.

It seems to work as my car is running very smoothly.

Regards,

Peter.

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JOE-DOT-COM    212

Hi Peter

The only problem with that method Peter is, Your oil will be getting thinner and thinner and could end up being mainly diesel, which will not lubricate as well as oil

If it were my car, I'd change the oil every time, especially if you only have to do it once every 6 months

Have you ever seen a diesel runaway, basically because the oil ends up being mainly diesel, hot, it feeds the cylinders, it runs flatout, till it explodes, or the engine oil runs out, destroying itself, runaway diesel are near impossible to stop

look here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j4rMfrERpG8

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5zx3qKX_Pno

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rLzf3ItkbOE

scary stuff

cheers

Joe

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Wat    10

Serious stuff this I'll have to stop coming on to this site.....frightening

  • Like 2

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Old Peter    639

Hi Joe, 

I have only extracted oil twice, once about two pints and replaced with 1 point fresh oil  ---  The oil was changed a couple of months later.

The second time I took all the oil out and replaced it.

I do have the oil changed every service  --  the oil and a new filter costs about £75  ---  quite cheap, really.

I had on the first Honda Dreams in the UK  ---   1962   ---  and I used to change the oil every other Thursday when I got home from work and the engine was hot. I was off every other Friday and would refill with oil,

I did 100k on that motor cycle in three years without a problem

Regards,

Peter.

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JOE-DOT-COM    212
20 minutes ago, Old Peter said:

Hi Joe, 

I have only extracted oil twice, once about two pints and replaced with 1 point fresh oil  ---  The oil was changed a couple of months later.

The second time I took all the oil out and replaced it.

I do have the oil changed every service  --  the oil and a new filter costs about £75  ---  quite cheap, really.

I had on the first Honda Dreams in the UK  ---   1962   ---  and I used to change the oil every other Thursday when I got home from work and the engine was hot. I was off every other Friday and would refill with oil,

I did 100k on that motor cycle in three years without a problem

Regards,

Peter.

Hi Peter

Sounds good

cheers

Joe

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david moore    49

joe, watched with great interest !  makes sense to always check the oil levels.  good one joe to post this... many thanks, dave.

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O.T.H    68

Joe is quite correct when he said a runaway engine was nearly impossible to stop --It happened to me with a truck and it was horrendous

the engine went past max rev's and of the clock I couldn't get it out of gear and the brakes where red hot --In the end a rod went through the

side of the block and jammed the engine with such a force it tore it of its mountings --I hope no one experiences this .good Luck.

Frank

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Old Peter    639

This issue shows how important oil is in cars, particularly in diesel engines.

Preventative maintenance, while it can be a bit tedious, is always worth the time spent doing what are really minor jobs.

Peter. 

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Leo    33
17 hours ago, JOE-DOT-COM said:

Hi

Saw this on face book and thought it was worth mentioning

cheers

Joe

16299814_1238370869583835_1623617761788894633_o.jpg

It certainly is something which needs to be taken very seriously indeed.

I would have thought that on both an automatic and a manual you could knock it into neutral: It will destroy the engine (which would happen anyway) but at least not be such a danger to life and limb!

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Old Peter    639

Hi All, 

While I firmly believe that this danger ought to be known to all  drivers, particularly Diesel drovers, I have done a little bit of checking and find that this fault happens rarely.  I have also found that it has never happened on a Jaguar.

At the same time, Joe has pointed us towards a problem that has occurred before, as Frank has shown, and it is well to know what any problem is and the ways to avoid it.

Regards,

Peter.

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Latjag    1

I had a serious road incident today which I would like to warn all of my contacts about - especially, if they are using or contemplate getting a DIESEL vehicle.

Back in 2005, lawmaker lunatics in the EU passed the so-called Euro 4 legislation which limited exhaust particles below any reasonably achievable threshold. This forced carmakers to supplement their cars with DPFs (diesel particle filters). 

When a car is mostly driven within a city (and not so much on motorways), this filter quickly gets full. Cleaning it (they use the word "regenerating") then usually requires a prolonged motorway drive.

So when my DPF got full yet again today, I took my car to a motorway for that prolonged drive. It used to take me an hour on average in the past for it to clean and the warning message to go off.

This time, however, it just never happened. Along the way, I stopped at the traffic lights. When the light went green and I gently hit the accelerator pedal, my car suddenly took off at about 100 mph in a huge cloud of thick smoke coming from its exhaust pipes. 

I was no doubt lucky I was first at the traffic lights with no cars ahead of me. Yet mechanics say I was even more lucky to somehow eventually pull over and stall the engine. Diesel fuel that was being pumped for the DPF cleaning got into the engine oil sump, so the engine quickly reached a huge reading of RPM (revolutions per minute), making the car take off like at a racing track. 

Usually, drivers panic extremely in such instances of a runaway diesel, abandon control of the vehicle, or try to shut off the engine before pulling over to a safe zone, forgetting this would also immediately lock the steering wheel. I had no prior experience or knowledge of such situations yet managed to do everything just as one should while staying calm all the way. Luck, a higher force - you name it - helped me stay alive and keep other drivers around me unharmed in an uncontrolled smoke-covered car which suddenly took off at over 100 mph. 

I later learned my vehicle (Jaguar XF 2.7D) was banned from imports to the United States due to one of their engineers having voiced a risk of this very possibility, however remote it might have seemed at the time. So don't blame Americans for stuff like pulling from the Paris Accords - they are a nation of carmakers, among other things, and know that some measures like the Euro 4 standard might not cost just money but also lives - many lives. So they came up with solutions like Tesla but not with potentially deadly filters like DPF.

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Old Peter    639

I have an s type with the same engine.  I live in a city and only drive about 6,000 miles a year.  I use Shell V power all the time - there is a shell station 500 yards away.

I also make sure that at least once a month I do a short drive, about 40 minutes, when I put the car into third gear and keep the revs on 2000rpm.  

I have never had a DPF warning light on.

Peter. 

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GaryE    33

i haven't either Peter, i use a good fuel, maintain the car properly  . has a good run once a month, keeps it fresh

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Latjag    1

A lot depends on your car's mileage. If it's still relatively low, your DPF will manage to regenerate every time like mine did until now but will find it increasingly harder every next time until an eventual failure to do so might lead to a situation like mine. It's really impossible to say for sure when that point of no return will come.

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Old Peter    639
38 minutes ago, GaryE said:

i haven't either Peter, i use a good fuel, maintain the car properly  . has a good run once a month, keeps it fresh

Preventative maintenance is always the best thing to do.  A Can of DPF cleaner is not expensive, once a while.

Peter.

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Latjag    1

That's the most upsetting part about it - just had it done three months ago.

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JOE-DOT-COM    212

Hi

Its also important on diesels to keep regular checks on the oil level

They don't tend to fail if the oil level stays correct

if the oil rises after a certain level, it can easily be sucked back into the engine via the crankcase breather, which is directly connected to the inlet side of the engine

cheers

Joe

 

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Latjag    1

Was it not possible for Jaguar to design the engine in a way which would prevent this from happening?

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JOE-DOT-COM    212

Hi

Its a common problem on diesel's, all diesel's not just jaguar's

its commonly Injectors failing, leaking injectors is one, they use really high pressures and when they wear with age, they leak, not usually a issue when its running

its when you stop the car, the injector weeps diesel into the cylinder, only very small amounts, but this diesel seeps past the piston ring into the crankcase and mixes with the engine oil

sometime symptoms can be hard starting when hot, or engine won't rev clean when first started,

regular dpf faults and regens can also be symptoms

but usually if it starts and drives correct and oil levels stays constant, then there's usually no issues

the 2.7tdv6 is used by quite a few manufacturers, peugeot, citroen, renault, land rover, so its quite reliable unit as a rule

cheers

Joe

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Old Peter    639

The 2.7 Gemini Engine was designed as a Joint venture between Ford and Peugeot, wth input from other manufacturers who intended to use it.

I check the oil every week and if it rises I take some out, making sure I take more out than necessary, so that I can then add some new oil to ensure that the engine oil is not diluted.

If you look after the engine in your car by a few sinple tasks, the modern diesel will last for years.

Peter.

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Latjag    1

Three months ago, when I had my oil changed, I also had the injectors replaced which broke down because of the said DPF clogging problem. So this happened to me with both new oil and new injectors.

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Old Peter    639

When the DPF is regenerating she fuel is directed towards the DPF to assist in the regeneration. Any unburnt oil will remain in the engine, and your dipstick will indicated that there is too much oil, and it is worth checking every week.  New oil or old oil does not matter.

If the DPF is full of soot, however new the engine and parts, the issue will still arise.

Peter. 

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Latjag    1

Just heard back from the garage I will need a new engine. Never again a DPF-equipped diesel for me. 

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Katee34    0

Thanks for this post and follow up.  I once saw a taxi diesel engine runaway until it destroyed itself and it was not a pretty sight - and nothing could be done. Fortunately it was stationary!

My mechanic also advised me that it is essential with a diesel to ensure that oil changes do not result in over fill.  It is better to be a bit short than have too much for all the reasons above. Even without leakage of fuel into the oil, an engine having too much oil can also end up with the hot oil being forced past the pistons to the combustion space!

I used to think garages were cutting things short when the oil gauge did not show absolutely full after a service -- but now know better!

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