Jaguar Owners Club

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About Jaguar Owners Club

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    Trevor
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    No Jaguar
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    Dorset

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  1. Premium Members can get 10% discount on marked Prices (not sale items)
  2. Hi Philip.....welcome to the Club Glad to hear the teething problems weren't too severe and you are enjoying the XF. Good to have you onboard Trevor
  3. Hi Malcolm...welcome to the Club ....and also welcome to the wonderful world of Jaguar! If you need to know anything just ask in the Forum as there are a lot of knowledgable members in here. Good to have you onboard Trevor
  4. Hi Dave...welcome to the Club I think that must be everyone's first memory of the XJS, it was certainly mine and I wonder how many cars they sold off the back of that TV series. If you need to know anything just ask in the Forum as there are a lot of knowledgable members in here. Good to have you onboard Trevor
  5. Hi Brian and Jo..welcome to the Club If you need to know anything just ask in the Forum as there are a lot of knowledgable members in here. Good to have you onboard Trevor
  6. Hi Paul...welcome to the Club ....and also welcome to the wonderful world of Jaguar! If you need to know anything just ask in the Forum as there are a lot of knowledgable members in here. Good to have you onboard Trevor
  7. Hi Richard....welcome to the Club Sorry for the late response, been away from the computer for a while. You certainly have a superb mk9 there. I once restored the major mechanical units for one once....superb engineering of the day and carried through for many years to come. Good to have you onboard and hopefully you'll find our forum software platform easy to use....any issues then just let us know and we'll endeavour to assist where we can. Cheers, Trevor
  8. Hi Geoff....sorry for the late reply Welcome to the Forum Wow! you have quite a collection of British cars, obviously a sucker for punishment 😁 No really, superb cars and hope you find a nice XK8 to join the fold....although they are getting harder to find as time goes by. Good to have you onboard Cheers, Trevor
  9. HaHa....I wouldn't have thought of checking there myself, would probably have happened across it at some point like yourself. Just goes to show, never assume!
  10. I would say at a guess that it is either the fuse was tapped into a switchable polarity (e.g. switches to earth - similar to electric windows) or the cable was trapped somewhere shorting to earth?
  11. Hi Frank....good to have you back on the forum It would be great if you could answer any questions that you may have the answer to as this does seem to be a widespread problem where the original poster comes in, asks the question, gets the answer and then goes without giving feedback, e.g. did the answer resolve the problem? If you need any help with a few batches of questions then please let me or any other moderators know and we will see what we can do to fill this void. You should be able to answer posts by clicking Reply to Topic or Quote and this should open a response box. Beautiful XKR by the way....looks like it is cherished and nice to see the attention to detail. Cheers . Trevor
  12. The car of the future could help win the battle against superbugs – according to Jaguar Land Rover. Future models could help stop the spread of colds and flu thanks to innovative ultraviolet light technology (UV-C) borrowed from the medical industry, where it has been used for more than 70 years. By integrating UV-C, Jaguar Land Rover believes it could help to stop bacteria and harmful viruses, known as pathogens, from surviving in the cabin. UV-C is currently widely used for disinfecting water, filtering air and sterilising surfaces by utilising wavelengths of light between 200 – 280 nanometres. Exposing pathogens to UV-C within the air conditioning system breaks down the molecular structure of the DNA, neutralising them. Clean air is then released into the cabin. The technology could even help in the fight against drug-resistant superbugs. Jaguar Land Rover is exploring UV-C technology as part of its vision to create a tranquil sanctuary inside each of its luxury vehicles. The manufacturer is piloting a wide range of driver and passenger wellbeing features, as it looks towards a self-driving future. Dr Steve Iley, Jaguar Land Rover Chief Medical Officer, said: “The average motorist spends as much as 300 hours per year behind the wheel. There is a clear opportunity to better utilise cars for administering preventative healthcare.” “The implementation of individual wellbeing measures as part of our ‘tranquil sanctuary’ research promises to not only improve quality of life for our customers but in this case, offers clear advantages in reducing pathogen spread – protecting the overall population from the threat of disease; particularly as we move towards shared mobility solutions.” Jaguar Land Rover is already actively seeking to neutralise pathogens in its latest generation Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) systems, available across the range including the all-electric Jaguar I-PACE and Range Rover Sport. The current Four-zone Climate Control and Cabin Air Ionisation system works by using high voltage to create trillions of nano-sized negatively charged particles (ions) coated in water molecules. These ions deactivate pathogens, forming larger particles which are removed from the air as they are brought back into the filter. As well as combatting pathogens, the ions also act upon odour molecules and allergens in a similar way. Dr Iley said: “In the colder months infections are spread more easily, it’s reassuring to know that in your car at least, you can be confident that harmful pathogens are being neutralised.” Recent medical trials* suggest the use of UV-C could be even more effective as it has been shown to cut the transmission of four major superbugs by up to 30%. Researchers focused on four drug-resistant organisms: MRSA, vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), C. difficile and Acinetobacter. Immunology expert, Dr. Hellmut Münch, CEO at Medical Enzyme Research Association, said: “The rise of superbugs and allergens is one of the largest threats we face as a species today. Investment in immunology is vital in ensuring that our immune systems stay ahead of the race against microorganisms, which are evolving far quicker than traditional pharmaceuticals can keep pace with. It is important that we continue to take an innovative look at how we can adapt our environment to help prevent the spread of the most harmful pathogens - which is why this research is paramount.”
  13. Speed limiting technology looks set to become mandatory for all vehicles sold in Europe from 2022, after new rules were provisionally agreed by the EU Do you agree with this or not, will it save lives? Have your say now....vote in the poll
  14. Speed limiting technology looks set to become mandatory for all vehicles sold in Europe from 2022, after new rules were provisionally agreed by the EU The Department for Transport said the system would also apply in the UK, despite Brexit. Campaigners welcomed the move, saying it would save thousands of lives. Road safety charity Brake called it a "landmark day", but the AA said "a little speed" helped with overtaking or joining motorways". Safety measures approved by the European Commission included intelligent speed assistance (ISA), advanced emergency braking and lane-keeping technology. The EU says the plan could help avoid 140,000 serious injuries by 2038 and aims ultimately to cut road deaths to zero by 2050. EU Commissioner Elzbieta Bienkowska said: "Every year, 25,000 people lose their lives on our roads. The vast majority of these accidents are caused by human error. "With the new advanced safety features that will become mandatory, we can have the same kind of impact as when safety belts were first introduced." What is speed limiting technology and how does it work? Under the ISA system, cars receive information via GPS and a digital map, telling the vehicle what the speed limit is. This can be combined with a video camera capable of recognising road signs. The system can be overridden temporarily. If a car is overtaking a lorry on a motorway and enters a lower speed-limit area, the driver can push down hard on the accelerator to complete the manoeuvre. A full on/off switch for the system is also envisaged, but this would lapse every time the vehicle is restarted. How soon will it become available? It's already coming into use. Ford, Mercedes-Benz, Peugeot-Citroen, Renault and Volvo already have models available with some of the ISA technology fitted. However, there is concern over whether current technology is sufficiently advanced for the system to work effectively. In particular, many cars already have a forward-facing camera, but there is a question mark over whether the sign-recognition technology is up to scratch. Other approved safety features for European cars, vans, trucks and buses include technology which provides a warning of driver drowsiness and distraction, such as when using a smartphone while driving, and a data recorder in case of an accident. What does it all mean in practice? Theo Leggett, business correspondent The idea that cars will be fitted with speed limiters - or to put it more accurately, "intelligent speed assistance" - is likely to upset a lot of drivers. Many of us are happy to break limits when it suits us and don't like the idea of Big Brother stepping in. However, the new system as it's currently envisaged will not force drivers to slow down. It is there to encourage them to do so, and to make them aware of what the limit is, but it can be overridden. Much like the cruise control in many current cars will hold a particular speed, or prevent you exceeding it, until you stamp on the accelerator. So it'll still be a free-for-all for speeding motorists then? Not quite. Under the new rules, cars will also be fitted with compulsory data recorders, or "black boxes". So if you have an accident, the police and your insurance company will know whether you've been going too fast. If you've been keeping your foot down and routinely ignoring the car's warnings, they may take a very dim view of your actions. In fact, it's this "spy on board" which may ultimately have a bigger impact on driver behaviour than any kind of speed limiter. It's easy to get away with reckless driving when there's only a handful of traffic cops around to stop you. Much harder when there's a spy in the cab recording your every move. All of this may well reduce accidents, but it won't eliminate them. You can force people to slow down, you can watch what they're doing, you can help them with emergency braking - but you can't get rid of basic bad driving. Unless, of course, you have self-driving cars. How has the idea been received? The move was welcomed by the European Transport Safety Council, an independent body which advises Brussels on transport safety matters. But it said it could be several months before the European Parliament and Council formally approve the measures. The European Parliament will not be able to consider the provisional rules until after its elections take place in May. UK statistics show more than 1,700 people are killed on UK roads every year, while Brake says speed is a contributory factor in about a quarter of all fatal crashes. Brake's campaigns director, Joshua Harris, said: "This is a landmark day for road safety. These measures will provide the biggest leap forward for road safety this century." The UK's Department for Transport said: "We continuously work with partners across the globe to improve the safety standards of all vehicles. These interventions are expected to deliver a step-change in road safety across Europe, including the UK." The Association of British Insurers held out the possibility that premiums could be reduced as a result. It said: "Motor insurers support measures aimed at improving road safety. Any steps that can be shown to make our roads safer, reducing road crashes and insurance claims, can be reflected in the cost of motor insurance." What do critics say? The AA thinks the system might have the unintended consequence of making drivers more reckless, not less. AA president Edmund King said there was no doubt that new in-car technology could save lives, adding there was "a good case" for autonomous emergency braking to be fitted in all cars. "When it comes to intelligent speed adaptation, the case is not so clear," he said. "The best speed limiter is the driver's right foot. "The right speed is often below the speed limit - for example, outside a school with children about - but with ISA, there may be a temptation to go at the top speed allowed." Mr King added: "Dodgem cars are all fitted with speed limiters, but they still seem to crash." HAVE YOUR SAY - VOTE IN THE POLL NOW!
  15. The UK government’s Office for National Statistics says that over 15 million people commute to work by car or van, and face a daily risk to their back, neck, shoulders and legs. Dr Steve Iley, Jaguar Land Rover' Chief Medical Officer, says new vehicle technology is part of the solution. But only if it is used properly. Our step by step guide will help you to adjust your seat and posture to find the correct driving position.