R2e

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R2e last won the day on January 19

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About R2e

  • Rank
    Advanced Member

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  • First Name
    Ron

Profile Information

  • Gender *
    Male
  • Jaguar Model
    S-Type
  • Year of Jaguar
    2002
  • UK/Ireland Location
    Kent

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  1. What's it like?

    I too don't know how to explain 'the Jaguar effect' but there seems no doubt that it exists. When people ask I say that it is simply the best car I have ever had. That seems to do the trick, but it is rather more than that, as Joe says the first time you drive one you are hooked, and I certainly was though I didn't buy at that stage (1999) as the car was developing a bad reputation for reliability and I was frightened off (I bought a Merc E Class instead). However I never forgot the experience and when it came time to get rid of my Mercedes ML350 last year (my wife has a bad back and was having problems getting in and out so a saloon was mandated) the S Type found itself at the top of the list so I did my homework, including asking questions on this and other forums so I knew what to look for. My specifications were simple, it had to be pre 2006, I only do about 4000 miles a year and I'd rather pay £300 road tax for the privilege than £500, it had to fit within my budget after I'd sold the ML, and finally my preference was for the V8, though I would have had a V6 if I failed to find a good V8. Fuel consumption is not an issue for me as my employer funds most of my mileage. I lost the first one I went for pipped to the post by someone who put down a deposit (I'd have paid the entire amount on the spot in cash, but the dealer felt they had to give the guy time to get the rest of his money together). I waited about ten days while keeping an eye open on Autotrader, etc, and up popped a V8 only about 15 miles from my home. I visited, inspected and drove the car, paid my money and drove away in the car, and I haven't regretted it for an instant in the seven months since. When my local butcher saw me driving the Jag he said to me that he thought there was something special about Jags, and he had had nothing else but in the past 25 years! I am having a strange experience at the present time. My radio has lost sound (I am trying to get this solved, something to do with the optic network, with the help of Paul {Raistlin}). As one who has the radio on all the time, I thought this was going to be a problem. Instead I find myself enjoying listening to the muted sound of the V8 while appreciating the smoothness and quietness of the car, no squeaks, rattles or thumps. It simply soaks up the road and that push in the back and suppressed roar when I floor the throttle is even more fun! All my Mercedes (and I had four of them) were simply cars, albeit very good and very reliable cars but I felt no regret when it was time for them to go. The Jag is different, there is a sort of love affair going on here and should the worst happen and it gets condemned or written off, I have no doubt I would be looking for another!
  2. Wheel alignment

    That is good value Joe, the last time I had a car 4 wheel aligned was an MGF about fifteen years ago which cost me about £120 at the time. Fortunately the alignment plus a new wheel and tyre were paid for my the company who didn't fix a pothole correctly and it washed out during a rain storm. Lucky it was me, and not a motorcyclist that hit it. I did try to get the police to put up a barrier of some sort before there was a serious accident but they weren't interested.
  3. Classic Jags for sale

    My sincere apologies, it's probably racist of me to say so, but all XKs look much the same to me, low, difficult for me to get into now, and go past so fast I think of them as a blur.... but maybe that's my eyes. I'm obviously much more gullible than you are, and clearly not as practised. "A recent inspection was done by a RR mechanic" , means I would trust the seller completely and assume that the Bentley was in tip top condition though, to be fair, I would expect to see the mechanic's report! It does have nearly a year's MOT but with a lot of advisories so perhaps one to be avoided. The XJR on the other hand has a new MOT with no advisories, and a good MOT history (one fail for a missing CAT and emissions, naughty, naughty!). And I see the interesting XJR-S failed in June this year with some corrosion which was obviously fixed as it passed a week later with no advisories. Sadly, unless I win Lotto this weekend, I will not be at the sale. And that is unlikely as I haven't bought a Lotto ticket for donkey's years. Still, you never know.........
  4. Courtesy of MSN this morning, Anglia Car Auctions have a couple of classic jags for sale https://angliacarauctions.co.uk/en/classic-auctions/latest-classic-car-catalogue/saturday-27th-january-2018/1998-jaguar-xjr-v8-supercharged/ https://angliacarauctions.co.uk/en/classic-auctions/latest-classic-car-catalogue/saturday-27th-january-2018/1988-jaguar-xjr-s-60-prototypedevelopment-car/ And if you fancy a real piece of luxury, the Bentley 8 https://angliacarauctions.co.uk/en/classic-auctions/latest-classic-car-catalogue/saturday-27th-january-2018/1986-bentley-eight/ Do I see an XK8 zooming quickly across country from Wales Carole? If I had some spare cash I'd be tempted myself!
  5. Strangely Wayne my first visit to the States was in 1974 and one of the places we visited was Detroit where my Mum's elderly uncle and aunt lived. He had worked most of his adult life for Ford, and although at the time I was a GM person, we had to be taken on a tour round the Ford Factory where they were building, wait for it, Mustang II. I must admit I was unimpressed by the production line operatives who seemed more interested in eyeing up any mini skirted girl on the tour than making a good job of what they were doing. I have to agree with you about Japanese cars, they're very worthy, but unexciting. I had a Mazda 929 estate once as a company car (this was in Africa around 79/80, I don't believe this model was imported into the UK) it was an adequate cruiser, but the handling was pretty dire. My wife used it most of the time while I travelled backwards and forwards to work on my 1967 BSA 650 Lightning which I had built from a large quantity of scrap and nos parts bought at auction (for a pittance!) from the local police force when they retired the model! My S Type is my daily driver, but as I work from home when I'm not travelling around the world, I only do 4k-5k miles per year, most of it backwards and forwards to the airport and most of it funded by my employers, it is fine in this role. And what a pleasure to drive!
  6. Yay, shiney new MOT

    Congratulations, always a relief to pass the MOT! But no leaper? I've flirted with the idea of an XJ8 a couple of times in the past but decided they were just too big to be a car for every day use, they are a lovely vehicle though.
  7. My S Type

    That would indubitably be 'knees, bach' which would allow Carole the luxury of being Welsh, which in my experience is always a good concession to make
  8. My S Type

    I find myself wondering if Jaguar ever envisaged Welsh Funeral Director owners conveying the souls of the late departed in their Captain Cat? Perhaps if they had they'd have built in luxury plume mountings as an optional extra along with twin coal black anodised leapers to provide that extra bit of class in Llareggub when Jones the coal goes to meet his maker? I confess I only reached the heights of one of Mrs Ogmore-Pritchard's late husbands in amdram... Sadly, I can't recall if I was Ogmore or Pritchard. Sad isn't it? But by courtesy of a very good friend from Dolgellau, a native Welsh speaker, my accent was beyond reproach, no mean feat for a Scotsman (Och awa an bile yer heid bach)!
  9. My S Type

    Divisive is right Jim! Mine arrived with the leaper and while I have to admit if it hadn't I probably wouldn't have fitted one, I do like the view down the long bonnet using the leaper to point where I'm going, and reminds me of the Mercedes star I had on my '98 E Class. However the grille.... Before I actually took delivery, I had already decided I would fit the mesh grille. However, once I had the car, I became fonder of the classic waterfall look. I would like the bars to be in chrome but that's about the only change I would want to make. Similarly my car came with chrome surrounds on the headlights, the taillights, etc, and though I like the chrome look, I wouldn't have added these if they had not already been present.
  10. Hi Peter, I totally agree with what you say. I worked abroad in the motor industry, for a GM dealer from '70 to '76' and for Leyland Truck and Bus '77 to '81, so I saw the demise at first hand. Unfortunately the management/union issue was exacerbated by the class system with which England was (and is still) burdened, particularly in Leyland. Vauxhall/Bedford did not seem to have as many problems, and they had a marvellous parts system with a computer controlled automated warehouse in Dunstable, but it was interesting to compare the efficiency of imports from the UK, South Africa (Chevrolet), Australia (Holden), the US (Detroit Diesel and the GM family), Antwerp (AC Delco) and Germany (Opel). By and large the UK were as good as the others. Possibly because of American management, Vauxhall/Bedford did not seem to have the same inefficiencies and atrocious labour relations I found in Leyland where at almost every level there was a poisonous 'them and us' attitude. Visiting from abroad I was sort of considered outside of all this so heard the complaints from both sides. Incidentally I cannot comment on the situation at the car plants in your neck of the woods but I did visit Unipart in Oxford and Butec at Thame and found them seemingly untainted by this attitude. One of the biggest problem with Leyland Truck and Bus was that they believed they had a 'premium' vehicle (as they had had at one stage in their history) and priced the vehicles and the parts accordingly. Unfortunately the customers who ran Leylands alongside Mercedes, Toyota, Isuzu, Mack, etc, did not consider them premium in fact they put them on the same level as Bedford and Ford Trucks in terms of quality and reliability, and lesser than the German, Japanese and US Trucks and that is one of the things that led to their sad demise. I might also say that I saw Sales Reps from all over the world, the most arrogant and unrealistic ones were, I am ashamed to say, the Brits who expected me to buy because they were British and therefore the best, and of course I was British therefore it was only right, wasn't it? Well no actually! For a long time British colonies had reduced customs tariffs for goods from the UK compared with the rest of the world and the UK therefore sort of had semi captive markets, why buy a Japanese car at a premium price when you could buy a Cortina or an Austin 1100 a bit cheaper. As these colonies gained independence the preferential rates were taken away and now people could compare, as my father did, a Toyota Corona with an FC Victor or an Austin Cambridge. The Toyota was cheaper, came with heater, clock and radio, even a folding wedge to go behind the wheel when you dealt with a puncture, as standard, beeped if you took the key out and left the lights on, etc, all the toys and thoughtful touches anyone could want and most of which were not even extra cost options on British cars at that time. My Dad bought the Toyota in 1967 and it served, totally reliably, until he sold it in 1982 at which point it had over 200,000 miles on the clock. I suspect that the British Motor Industry management no longer had the push to innovate and find out what the customer really wanted, so they sat back on their laurels and slowly disintegrated while others took their business without so much as a tinge of regret.
  11. Actually, having worked for a Lucas dealer in the late 1960's (yes I am that old!), I find this demonisation of Lucas undeserved. Until the malaise and militant unionsism that hit UK manufacturing generally in the 1970s , they were a !Removed! good and innovative company. Lucas in my opinion, were it not for the bloodymindedness of the unions, would have become the British Bosch. And yes, before you start thinking I have right wing credentials, the management were atrocious. But it is all, like the Comet and technology like the jet engine passed on FOC to the US, missed opportunity. Excuse me while I have a little weep........
  12. Carole, I am distraught, I completely forgot to issue the warning "DO NOT TRY THIS AT HOME!!" (As an avid Forged in Fire fan this is unforgiveable)j while thoughtlessly posting my unicycle exploits. (Talking of unicycle, do we all remember the late lamented UNIPARTS? A useless attempt by BL to widen their market.). I am however totally concerned, vis a vis plumber's pipes, that you will be unable to direct your own funeral, should the absolute worst happen and the unicycle experiments prove fatal. I hope you have taken Michael Parkinson's advice to heart to cover that very eventuality and are, even now, enjoying your free pen and the prospect of M&S vouchers!
  13. Lurker from Hull

    I just call mine 'it'. My car has no name and no gender. Perhaps I am strange, or more likely I am the only sane one here....
  14. I should perhaps have mentioned, I have a plastic tube acting as a siphon to provide coffee on demand
  15. Lurker from Hull

    Is there a 'ull in the good ol' USA? With white phone boxes and a bridge over the 'umber?